ACD Systems community

ACD Systems Blog

Newer Older

ACDSee Photo Sharing Contest

2014-11-10 20:28:00 GMT

How to enter:

1. Send us your most CREATIVE photo. Anything goes! Send the photo to the ACD Systems Facebook page to enter. Include your full names, address, and phone number with your entry. Voting starts November 12th , 2014 noon PST, so get your entries in soon! We will accept entries at any time but you have a better chance to win if you send early!

2. Like the ACD Systems Facebook page HERE

3. Encourage your friends, family, and colleagues to vote for your photo by liking the ACD Systems Facebook page and liking, commenting on and sharing your photo. November 12th, 2014 noon PST, we will post all the photos and stories on our Facebook page to be voted on by Facebook users. December 12th, 2014 noon PST, the winner with the most votes wins!

Contest Official Rules: Please read the rules before entering this contest. By participating in the contest, you agree to be bound by these official rules and represent that you satisfy all of the eligibility requirements below. No purchase or payment of any kind is necessary to enter or win this contest. The contest is subject to all federal, state and local laws and regulations and is void where prohibited by law.

Eligibility: By submitting an entry, each contestant agrees to the rules of the contest and states that they are 21 years or older and a resident of Canada or the United States. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received.

Entry deadline: Contestants are encouraged to submit their creative photos by November 12th, 2014 noon PST.

Submission guidelines: Photo should be submitted as a jpeg. The photo must not contain material that violates, misappropriates, or infringes upon any law or regulation or the rights of any third party, including any copyright, trademark, or any rights of publicity or privacy, or any other intellectual property or proprietary rights. Entries are declared invalid if they are illegible, incomplete, mechanically reproduced, mutilated, forged, falsified, altered or tampered with in any way. Include your full names, address, and phone number with your entry. Submission can be made to the ACD Systems Facebook page.

Voting: Facebook users will be encouraged to vote with a ‘like’ for their favourite photo and story from November 12th, 2014 noon PST to December 12th, 2014 noon PST. Fake accounts and vote cheating will not be tolerated and the contestant may be disqualified if they are suspected of voter fraud. Any abusive, aggressive, or unsportsmanlike commentary will be deleted and the user be banned from the page.

Winner Selection: On December 12th, 2014 noon PST, the entry with the most votes wins! Prize cannot be transferred, substituted or redeemed for cash value. The winner will be contacted via email and must claim their prize before December, 2015.

Prize: The most voted photo will win a Leica V-LUX 3 and the new ACDSee Pro 8. Second and Third voted photos will win the new ACDSee Pro 8.

Additional Limitations: Prize is non-transferable. No substitution or cash equivalent of prizes is permitted. ACD Systems and its respective parent, affiliate and subsidiary companies, agents, and representatives are not responsible for any typographical or other errors in the offer or administration of the contest, including, but not limited to, errors in any printing or posting or these Official Rules, the selection and announcement of any winner, or the distribution of any prize. Any attempt to damage the content or operation of this contest is unlawful and subject to possible legal action by ACD Systems. ACD Systems reserves the right to terminate, suspend or amend the contest, without notice, and for any reason, including, without limitation, if ACD Systems determines that the contest cannot be conducted as planned or should a virus, bug, tampering or unauthorized intervention, technical failure or other cause beyond ACD System’s control corrupt the administration, security, fairness, integrity or proper play of the contest. In the event any tampering or unauthorized intervention may have occurred, ACD Systems reserves the right to void suspect entries at issue. ACD Systems and its respective parent, affiliate and subsidiary companies, agents, and representatives, and any telephone network or service providers, are not responsible for incorrect or inaccurate transcription of entry information, or for any human error, technical malfunction, lost or delayed data transmission, omission, interruption, deletion, line failure or malfunction of any telephone network, computer equipment or software, the inability to access any website or online service or any other error, human or otherwise.

Indemnification and limitation of liability
: By entering the contest, each entrant agrees to indemnify, release and hold harmless sponsor and its parent, affiliate and subsidiary companies, the Facebook platform, administrator, advertising and promotional agencies, and all their respective officers, directors, employees, representatives and agents from any liability, damages, losses or injury resulting in whole or in part, directly or indirectly, from that entrant’s participation in the contest and the acceptance, use or misuse of any prize that may be won. ACD Systems and its parent, affiliate and subsidiary companies do not make any warranties, express or implied, as to the condition, fitness or merchantability of the prize. ACD Systems and its parents, subsidiaries, affiliates, advertising and promotional agencies, and all their respective officers, directors, employees, representatives and agents disclaim any liability for damage to any computer system resulting from access to or the download of information or materials connected with the sweepstakes. This contest is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook.

Publicity: By participating, each entrant grants ACD Systems permission to use his/her name, likeness or comments for publicity purposes without payment of additional consideration, except where prohibited by law. Any questions regarding the contest should be directed to ACD Systems at marketing@acdsystems.com



ACDSee Mac Pro 3 & OS X Yosemite

2014-10-20 21:56:26 GMT

Dear ACDSee Users,

Our development team has been working hard to try to resolve the issues that have arisen with the latest update to OS X Yosemite when running ACDSee Mac Pro 3.

We are aware that some users have expressed frustration when posting on the forums and on social media. Please do not be concerned that your posts are lost or being ignored, or that no one is reading them. We can promise that they are being read. We hear and understand your frustrations. We are taking the feedback you provide to us and are relaying it to the dev team.

We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience caused, and thank you for all your patience as we work to resolve these issues.

The Team at ACDSee

Tags:



Filter on the Fly

2014-10-20 18:16:00 GMT

For that oft-needed dash of quirkiness or nostalgia, apply a variety of brand new effects without needing to go through a cumbersome, technical multi-step process.

ACDSee Pro 8 and ACDSee 18 have a bunch of new filters and effects, including our favorite the Bob Ross effect:


It’s a happy little tree!


Other new filters include:
  • Cartoon
  • Dramatic
  • Somber
  • Purple Haze
  • Seventies
  • Blue Steel
  • Childhood


A while back we posted a tutorial called "How to Hipster", essntially we showed you how to turn a so-so photo into something different. Such as these:









It’s so easy to do!

Here’s how in 3 easy steps:

Step 1:Find a photo that you think deserves (more) attention. From Manage mode, select the photo and click Edit to enter Edit mode.

Step 2: In Edit mode, in the Add group, choose Special Effect. From the list choose your desired special effect.

Step 3: Configure the settings until you see your desired effect.
The Color Distortion slider is exactly what is sounds like, and depending on the color pixels in the image, you may get more blue/purple hues, or yellow/green. The Vignette Strength controls how much darkness curves into the photo from the edges for that bulb-is-about-to-burn-out-in-the-kinetoscope look.

Et voilia! You’ve turned something simple into something different.

For the whole “How to Hipster” tutorial go here.
Tags:



Photography in the dark

2014-10-17 18:10:00 GMT

In the spirit of Halloween we want you to get out there and take some spooky night photos!

Tips to shooting in the dark:
Be Prepared.
Before you go out and dabble in the art of night photography, you should have all the right equipment and know how to use it beforehand. But don’t be afraid to experiment!


Photo courtesy of ACDSee photographer Serge Timacheff


Tools needed for shooting in the dark:
Tripod
- A shaky camera just won’t do! Shooting in the dark requires long exposures and having a steady camera is key to getting your best shot. If you don’t have access to a tripod you can get resourceful and use a flat surface to rest your camera on, but a tripod is a good investment.

Cable release - This will also help to keep your camera steady during those long exposures. A cable release (wired or wireless) will minimize any camera shake caused by pressing the shutter release button. If you don’t have access to a cable release, most cameras have a timer that you can set for a few seconds, long enough that you are no longer touching the camera by the time the shutter goes.

Flash - If you must use a flash, use an external flash. Point the flash up at a 45-degree angle - this is called a ‘bounce flash’, and gives a softer, more pleasing effect. If this is the style of photo you are going for, feel free to try experimenting by using diffusers or covering the flash with a tissue or handkerchief.

Wide angle lens - This is the best choice for shooting night skies, and a zoom lens makes it even more versatile. Ideally your lens should have an infinity focusing mode.


Photo courtesy of ACDSee photographer Serge Timacheff


Camera settings for shooting in the dark:
Manual Mode
- It’s always best to use your camera’s manual mode when shooting at night.

ISO - Set your camera to the lowest possible ISO; for many cameras this is 100 ISO.

Aperture - Adjust your aperture to let int he most light possible. This is done by adjusting your settings to the lowest f-stop; in most cameras this is f3.5.

Shutter speed - For quality night shots your shutter should be set at a slow speed, without increasing your ISO setting. This allows enough time to let light into the sensor. There is no magic shutter speed to suit every situation, so try testing a few shots at 5-10 seconts, then 20 and 30 seconds. View the images on your LCD display to judge which shutter speed works best for that particular night.

Now get out there after dark and get shooting! Don’t forget to share your images on ACDSee 365 for your chance to be a featured photographer on www.acdsee.com - just be sure your images are marked “public”.
Tags:



Why I Moved From Lightroom to ACDSee Pro

2014-10-07 16:29:00 GMT

Please enjoy this guest post from ACDSee user Glen Barrington.

About this time, last year (late 2012 – Early 2013), I thought I’d start to reconsider my options regarding my photographic tools. Of which, Lightroom had been probably the single most important tool I used. And for good reason, it works and it works well. But I had grown increasingly uncomfortable with how Lightroom was forcing me down the “Lightroom” way of doing things. I wanted to see if some of the options that are available would be useful to me.

I decided that I would evaluate ACDSee Pro 6. If you recall, a few years ago, Aperture, ACDSee Pro, and Lightroom were all announced within about a month of each other. Actually it may have been with in a week or so. I recall it happened fast.

Since I was using a PC, my only choice was Lightroom and ACDSee Pro. I liked Lightroom better and started to use it. I had upgraded Lightroom to Lr 3.6 but as I said, I was starting to feel uncomfortable with the Lightroom way of doing things. Upon testing, I found ACDSee pro to be very compatible with my desired post processing style, and I decided to switch to it. This article is an explanation of my logic.

First, let me tell you what I like, dislike, and am ambivalent about in Lightroom so you can get an idea of what I value in photo software.

Lightroom Likes:
True nondestructive editing across the entire process. I can revert back to the original source at any time. There is never a point at which I can’t scrap what I’m doing and be made whole again as if I were starting the process over again.

DNG, I like not having to have separate sidecar files for each photo, all my nondestructive edits are stored in the dng file itself. It makes file management much simpler in my mind.

Virtual copies, I can explore wildly different ideas in how to use a photo with out having to keep track of different photo files. The database keeps track of all that for me.

Superb slider controls that make fine tuning effects and changes in real time pretty easy.

Presets, not just the presets themselves, but how Lr uses them. You can use them at import, at develop time at print time, it is almost never too late to implement a preset. They make getting a consistent look and feel to a single photo or large batch of photos very easy.

Adjustment Brush I particularly liked Dodge and Burn. I’ve been doing photography for over 50 years. The user interface in general, uses terms and concepts that seem natural and correct to me.

Lightroom Dislikes:
The database, yes I know, it makes many things I like possible. But dealing with it is a major PITA in my mind. Importing, exporting, I just want to get my photos into a ‘done’ state as quickly and painlessly as possible. I’ve been a teradata DBA for the last half of my adult life(so far!), and if I hate dealing with the database, I can only imagine the level of frustration it must give to those unfamiliar with database concepts.

Speed, I have an i7 quad core 64 bit 8 gig of ram PC, and importing large batches of photos is a SLOW process. And the crazy thing is I’m using a 12 mp camera, my image files just aren’t that large.

Dealing with a folder structure from within Lr. The folder structure in Lightroom is always a logical software construct, but it can also be a physical construct. In my mind, that complicates things immensely. I know it provides the maximum flexibility in how people can do things, but the user interface blurs the distinction between the two, and I don’t know how many times I’ve orphaned a thumbnail because I’ve moved the physical file outside of Lr and it can no longer find the file. Yes, it isn’t that difficult to correct, but I hate having to do it.

Resizing. Yes you have a lot of control, but you can’t SEE how the final output will look and there is always a difference, so it may take 2-3 passes to get it right. Other software packages do it much more simply. Even PSE make it easier to do.

Slideshow. Feature wise, it’s a ‘me too’ package in a pretty wrapper. I also dislike that you can only export a slide show as a PDF or as an mp4. I still like the idea of having an option of creating an executable.

Ambivalent
Printing It’s OK, I’ve seen better. I don’t print much any more, I’ve found that int he long run online printing services do just as well; but really, considering they can do sizes I can’t do and their printers are considerably better than the consumer printer I have at home. And the services cost less when you factor in the waste. When I do print it is usually for sharing with family so I use an elderly copy of ACDSee fotoslate 4, it’s good enough for the happy snap printing I do, but I will print from Lr3 occasionally and I don’t hate doing it.

Web I never use it, never needed it.

General Impressions of ACDSee Pro
It’s a very intuitive image browser based system. It reads raw files just fine (including dng), and has decent and accurate color managment. It has non destructive editing PLUS, it is REALLY REALLY fast compared to Lightroom, and while it has a database component, it doesn’t require an import of the photo into the DB. Instead, it sort of populates the database on the fly. As you get to a point in the workflow where some of the info you would want to put into the DB is revealed by you, it stores it. This actually works pretty well.

I would say it is competent as a workflow tool, especially if you are coming to it from a more primitive organizational system. However, for a Lightroom user who is used to doing things a certain way (even if it is an unwilling comfort), it can feel odd at times.

You need to understand that it is not a database centric application the way Lightroom is. This gives ACDSee it’s speed. But it also means that somethings have to be approached by the programmers differently than from Lightroom. I can see where a photographer is so heavily invested in the Lr way of doing could get frustrated and just give up on learning a different approach.

Initial boot
When I first booted ACDSee Pro 6, it immediately asked me to create a backup, and I attempted to do so, but it told me I didn’t have enough space to back up everything in the “My Pictures” Folder. This surprised me, since Lr has always backed up just fine.

Upon investigation of the photo folders through ACDSee, I THOUGHT that the neat folder format I thought I had wasn’t all that neat. I don’t know if Lr has allowed me to get a little sloppy or if I’m basically just a pig by nature, but I somehow had an enormous number of duplicate photos, not just raw files but several copies of identical “done” Tiff and jpeg files that I just didn’t need. Needless to say Lr has never backed THEM up, and some of these photos I needed to keep, though most of them were temporary files I no longer needed.

Well, as a more experienced user of ACDSee, I realize now that assumption on my part was also wrong. The backup that Lightroom does, is actually a back up of JUST the database information, NOT of the photos themselves. The ACDSee backup backs up both the database AND the photos.

Functionality Tabs
There are 5 module tabs in ACDSee Pro. They are:
1. Manage - the Organizer portion of ACDSee Pro
2. View - a photo viewer
3. Develop - The non destructive raw development ‘editor’ not unlike the Develop tab in Lr. Like Lr, it can also be used with non raw images.
4. Edit - A pretty decent conventional bit mapped editor. it doesn’t do layers nor can it use Photoshop plug-ins. But otherwise, a pretty good editor. I find myself using it more than I expected to.
5. 365 - This is an integrated portal to ACDSee 365. ACDSee 365 is a separate product, that is a cross between DropBox and Flikr.

Manage Module:
In resolving the folder structure issue mentioned above, I was able to use simple drag and drop file management techniques from within ACDSee Pro 7 to delete and move photo files into a more logical and coherent file structure. I was impressed with how ACDSee not only warned me of duplicates and asked me what I wanted to do with them,but actually SHOWED me both images to help me decide.

Otherwise, the manage mode pretty much looks pretty much like the ‘regular’ ACDSee that has been around for 15-20 years or so, and not that different from other image browsers like Irfanview or FastStone. It has no major surprises for anyone who has used an organizer built around an image browser. It should be pretty intuitive.

Other useful tools that stand out are a find duplicates tool, batch capability - that also works in both Develop and Edit mode, and a pretty decent slide show creator.

You can right click on an image and send it to an external editor. A problem in my mind is that If you R-Click on a raw file, the raw file itself gets sent. But the changes you have made in Develop module do not go with it, even to ACDSee’s standalone editor oddly (and confusingly) called ACDSee Photo Editor 6. And when you send a raw file to a different editor, say Corel Paint Shop Pro X6, PSP opens it first in its raw developer. Because its a raw file. Kind of defeats the purpose I think.

To send a “developed” but unedited raw photo to an external editor, you have to send a tif file just like Lightroom. However You can’t just R-click on a raw file and send a tiff version with edits to the external editor.

When you R-click on the photo, you can save to Tif there, but you need to remember to do it manually, the “send to editor” menu selection won’t do it. That is more complicated than it needs to be, but once you get used to it, it isn’t a significant workflow interruption, but still, I think it should be changed.

Processing Modules:
In ACDSee Pro, there are 2 photo processing modes:

Develop Module:
“Develop”, which is non destructive. This is where the raw processing and the raw related Development takes place. It is a VERY good raw developer, and I am very pleased with my raw output from this module. A major upgrade from Pro 6, is the enhanced Develop brushes.

You can define up to 7 different brushes for a single photo or work session. Essentially, they are masking brushes. Also, gradient masking is pretty nice, You can quickly and easily select, say, the sky or ground in a photo or a section of the photo and quickly make changes to just that area without affecting the rest of the photo.

Edit Module:
The other Processing mode is “Edit”. This module appears to be a pretty good but basic bit mapped editor so any rawfile that gets sent to it gets converted to a 16 bit, bit-mapped image. At this point, any pretense to non destructive editing stops. You can crop, burn dodge, sharpen adjust colors and levels apply curves, the usual stuff, but no layers. When you exit this mode you either have to save as a bitmapped file (i.e tif or jpg, or the others) or cancel the edit completely which destroys the bit mapped image leaving the raw alone.

The big addition to the bit mapped editing area, for me, are the “Tilt-Shift” Tool and the ability to use a brush to selectively sharpen or blur sections of the photo.

I have always associated the term “Tilt-Shift” with perspective control, but ACDSee has had that need covered for quite some time. Instead, ACDSee uses it to describe the ability to retro actively “Tilt and Shift the image’s plane of focus to emulate a view camera user’s ability to tilt and shift the back panel of a view camera.. It’s a pretty complex tool and will take time to learn to use it effectively and subtly.

MUCH easier to use is the Edit tab’s ‘Selective Detail’ brush. With it, you can ‘paint’ an area that needs to be selectively sharpened or softened. It’s pretty easy to use and I like it very much. Attached is a photo that was pretty sharp overall, but I used to soften the focus of the man in the background and the focus of the suitcase.



Processing Comments:

It does a very good job on raw development and on Bitmapped editing. Image quality is VERY high and the color is accurate. ProPhoto color space is well supported. Virtually everything that can be done in Develop mode, has an equivalent in the edit mode. And almost everything that can be done in Edit mode has an equivalent in Develop. I have found the Develop mode brushes are quite useful as I find the selection tools in Edit mode to be pretty good.

ACDSee Pro suits me, I think. I feel I have great control of my workflow and of the quality of my photos. That’s what this sort of tool should be all about.
Tags: